Engine Developers Face New Challenges

Engine developers face new trends in the industry that significantly influence how they produce engines for heavy-duty vehicles. Their main areas of concern include machine ownership patterns, political forces such as government regulations, and getting new products to the market quicker and more efficiently. Caterpillar Industrial Power Systems designed the new C3.6 engine with these factors in mind, stating specifically that customer feedback and lower owning and operating costs were at the top of their priorities list. According to Caterpillar, the result is the compact C3.6 engine that is electronically turbocharged, giving it the capability to produce 134-hp, more power density, and better torque than its predecessor.

As for machine ownership patterns, the product marketing manager for Caterpillar – Alex Eden – explains that customers are shifting towards a rental economy rather than the traditional ownership model. Instead of buying heavy-duty vehicles and machines, customers and fleets are looking to rent them. This raises questions about future sales processes and product cycles that are yet to be answered.

In addition to market influences, government regulations put pressure on engine developers with measures such as CO2 and emissions regulations, air quality improvement standards, and zero-emission zones for urban areas. In particular, demand grows for quieter engines that fall in line with urban noise restrictions. Noise, vibration and harshness (NVH) is a major concern in engine design. Pierpaolo Biffali – VP of product engineering at FPT Industrial – states that though the industry is heading for zero-emissions, clean diesel engines reduce CO2 levels in the meantime.

The last major factor that influences engine design is the competitiveness of the industry. When producing the C3.6, Caterpillar utilized a 3D printer to reduce production time. Developers printed an entire C3.6 engine in its various parts and examined how all the pieces would fit together before actual assembly. When the parts arrived, they assembled the engine faster and more efficiently than they had without the 3D printer which is crucial to remaining competitive in the market. Caterpillar believes that technology like this will help them remain competitive in the future by getting products to the market faster without sacrificing quality.

Taken from: www.sae.org

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