Posts Tagged ‘NHTSA’

Traffic Deaths Increased in 2016

Driving on the roads and highways in the United States can be dangerous. Statistics showing the number of fatalities caused during driving have been released by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. NHTSA released the stats which showed that traffic deaths increased in 2016 over the number of deaths recorded during the same amount of time in 2015. The trend for traffic-related fatalities has been increasing every year since 2014. This has some researchers at NHTSA concerned and looking for an answer as to why the numbers are increasing. Experts have mentioned that the increase in deaths is due to an increase in the number of miles that Americans are driving. The amount of driving has steadily increased as the economy has improved and Americans are also taking advantage of the low cost of fuel. However, the increase in deaths has far outpaced the increase in miles driven. In fact, the increase in traffic-related deaths has risen approximately 8 percent since the beginning of 2015, where the increase in miles traveled has only increased about 3 percent. The increase in fatalities seems to be located around certain areas of the country. For example, in the heart of New England, traffic related deaths have increased significantly; around 20 percent more than in 2015. In the western center of the United States, an area that includes North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming, Colorado, Utah and Nevada, the increase in fatalities has only risen about one percent. Even more concerning is the fact that traffic-related deaths have increased even while almost all automakers have developed significant safety systems in new vehicles in an attempt to make the vehicles safer. Systems such as stability control, traction control, lane departure warnings, backup cameras and other similar systems are now common in new vehicles. Despite the increase in vehicle safety systems, traffic deaths are on the rise. -taken from Detroit News

DOT announces increase in 2015 roadway deaths

NHTSA 02-16 Friday, February 5, 2016 Contact: Gordon Trowbridge, 202-366-9550, Public.Affairs@dot.gov The U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration today announced its latest estimate of traffic deaths, which show a steep 9.3 percent increase for the first nine months of 2015. The news comes as the agency kicks-off its first in a series of regional summits with a day-long event in Sacramento, Calif., to examine unsafe behaviors and human choices that contribute to increasing traffic deaths on a national scale. Human factors contribute to 94 percent of crashes according to decades of NHTSA research. “For decades, U.S. DOT has been driving safety improvements on our roads, and those efforts have resulted in a steady decline in highway deaths,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. “But the apparent increase in 2015 is a signal that we need to do more. The safety summits that NHTSA is kicking off today in Sacramento will provide us with new approaches to add to the tried-and-true tactics that we know save lives.” NHTSA estimates that more than 26,000 people died in traffic crashes in the first nine months of 2015, compared to the 23,796 fatalities in the first nine months of 2014. U.S. regions nationwide showed increases ranging from 2 to 20 percent. “We’re seeing red flags across the U.S. and we’re not waiting for the situation to develop further,” said Dr. Mark Rosekind, NHTSA Administrator. “It’s time to drive behavioral changes in traffic safety and that means taking on new initiatives and addressing persistent issues like drunk driving and failure to wear seat belts.” The estimated increase in highway deaths follows years of steady, gradual declines. Traffic deaths declined 1.2 percent in 2014 and more than 22 percent from 2000 to 2014. Today’s summit in California is the first in a series of cross-cutting regional summits being held across the country, capped by a nationwide gathering in Washington, to gather ideas, engage new partners, and generate additional approaches to combat human behavioral issues that contribute to road deaths. These summits will address drunk, drugged, distracted and drowsy driving; speeding; failure to use safety features such as seat belts and child seats; and new initiatives to protect vulnerable road users such as pedestrians and cyclists.

Automatic Braking Systems may become standard in Passenger Vehicles

Recently, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) released a special report that calls for automatic braking system to become standard in all cars. The board asserts that avoidance systems can help to prevent and lessen the severity of rear-end collisions. Since the NTSB does not actually set policy, its report is essentially an appeal to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to require new cars and trucks to include an automatic braking system.

In the report, the NTSB cited statistics from 2012 which indicated 1,700 deaths and 500,000 injuries occurred as a result of rear-end collisions. The board believes that an electronic avoidance system could have mitigated up to 80% of these deaths and injuries.

The automatic braking systems that the NTSB would like to make standard in new vehicles relies on a camera and laser radar technology to stop or slow down a car if it detects an object ahead, including another vehicle. The technology is currently available from most automotive manufacturers as part of a special safety package costing several hundred dollars extra. However, automakers remain reluctant to make it a standard feature.

The NTSB report criticizes “slow and insufficient action” by NHTSA, with regard to implementing this as standard technology in passenger and commercial vehicles, as well as “a lack of incentives for manufacturers” that have the ability to put the technology in more vehicles but only offer it in more expensive models.

The report advises manufacturers to add collision-warning systems and emergency braking into all vehicles. The NTSB also advises consumers to consider vehicles that have collision warning and emergency braking functions.

Previously Recalled Vehicle Remedies Not Working

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration announced the recall of more than 2.12 million Acura, Dodge, Jeep, Honda, Pontiac, and Toyota vehicles for a defect that may cause airbags to deploy inadvertently. The recalls will provide vehicle owners with a new remedy after the manufacturers’ original attempts to fix the defects proved ineffective in some vehicles. The new recalls cover 2.12 million Acura MDX, Dodge Viper, Jeep Grand Cherokee, Jeep Liberty, Honda Odyssey, Pontiac Vibe, Toyota Corolla, Toyota Matrix and Toyota Avalon models made in the early 2000’s. The vehicles were subject to earlier recalls to address a problem with an electronic component manufactured by TRW that caused some airbags to deploy inadvertently. NHTSA discovered through the monitoring of incoming data from consumers and automakers that some vehicles remedied under the previous recalls may have experienced inadvertent deployments. NHTSA urged all three automakers to issue new recalls to implement a more effective remedy. NHTSA has identified about 40 vehicles in which airbags deployed unexpectedly after receiving the original remedy. Action by consumers is especially important because about 1 million Toyota and Honda vehicles involved in these new recalls are also subject to a recall related to defective Takata airbags that may deploy with enough explosive force to cause injury or even death to vehicle occupants. Because of the dangers involved in an inadvertent deployment, and because some of the vehicles involved may also have defective Takata airbags, NHTSA urges consumers who were covered by the original recalls to take their vehicles to their local dealer for the original remedy. That remedy significantly reduces the chance of an airbag deployment that presents a safety risk. This is an urgent safety issue, and all consumers with vehicles covered by the previous recalls should have that remedy installed. Even though it’s a temporary solution until the new remedy is available, they and their families will be safer if they take the time to learn if their vehicle is covered and follow their manufacturers’ instructions. NHTSA will take a series of additional steps to ensure safety, including:
  • Seeking additional information from TRW, which made the electronic part believed to be involved in the inadvertent deployments, about the potential defect, its causes, and whether other makes or models might be affected.
  • Seeking information from the automakers about how quickly they can make the new, more effective remedy available.

Harley-Davidson recalls 19,000 Dyna & Softail models

Harley-Davidson announced that it is recalling just over 19,000 Dyna and Softail motorcycles from the 2012 model year because the threads for the brake line banjo bolt in the front brake master cylinder may corrode.  If the threads corrode, a sudden loss of brake fluid could result, causing a loss of the front brakes.  Dealers are asked to flush and inspect the front brake master cylinder and, if necessary, replace the master cylinder. NHTSA recall campaign number is 14V794000 and is expected to begin Jan. 14. Models affected are the 2012 FXST103, FLSTC, FLSTC103, FLSTF, FLSTF103, FXDL, FXDWG, FXDWG103, FXDC, FXDB, FLSTN, FLSTN103, FLSTC103 Shrine, FLSTFB, FLSTFB103, FXS, FXS103, FLS, FLS103, FLD, FLD103, and FXDF and FXDF103 motorcycles manufactured from Aug. 22, 2011, through Feb. 24, 2012, for the United States and some world markets. This totals 19,015 units, Harley-Davidson told NHTSA. “We have voluntarily declared this a defect related to motor vehicle safety (Campaign 0163 for the Softail model and Dyna model motorcycles and 0164 for the FXDF/FXDF103 model motorcycles) to allow us to formally recall all affected motorcycles. Two recalls are needed to cover all affected models because of the differences in the kit component content required for the two populations,” the Motor Co. informed dealers.  “Based on warranty information, the prediction for motorcycles requiring master cylinder replacements is extremely low,” Harley-Davidson said in its notification to dealers.  Dealers are permitted to sell but must not deliver any of the affected motorcycles until the remedy is complete, the OEM added.

Yamaha recalls 2014 YZF-R6 motorcycles

Yamaha Motor Corp. recently announced that it is recalling about a small number of 2014 YZF-R6 supersport motorcycles to replace wheels that may have not been properly hardened during manufacturing.  Although the recall notice only cites 28 potentially affected units, the bikes in question may have front and rear wheels that have not been properly treated, preventing them from achieving the correct hardness for durability and safe running.  Potential effects of the improper heat treatment are that the wheels could loosen or the tire sealing may be inadequate; either situation could increase the risk of a crash. Yamaha has already notified owners, and will replace both front and rear wheel and tire assemblies on the affected bikes free of charge. Owners may contact Yamaha customer service at 1-800-962-7926 and reference Yamaha’s recall number: 990088. As with all NHTSA recalls, owners may also contact the NHTSA Vehicle Safety Hotline at 888-327-4236 or go to www.safercar.gov.

NHTSA Website Lists Vehicle Recalls

Manufacturers who determine that their product or piece of original equipment either has a safety defect or is not in compliance with Federal safety standards are required to notify the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) within 5 business days. NHTSA requires that manufacturers file a Defect and Noncompliance report as well as quarterly recall status reports, in compliance with Federal Regulation 49 Part 573, which identifies the requirements for safety recalls. Visit NHSTA’s Safercar.gov website where you can search for recalls, file a complaint and sign up to receive email alerts for the latest recalls. Not all manufacturing or design defects are listed in the NHTSA recall database.  Often times product defects cause or contribute to accidents which result in serious injuries or death.  Veritech Engineers investigate accidents and failures, in part, to determine if there was a product defect associated with the cause of the incident.  Veritech’s staff of Professional Engineers work on a consulting basis to evaluate and investigate incidents involving mechanical systems and designs.

Checkpoints are Cost-Effective Deterrents to DUI

DUI/Drivers License checkpoints have been shown to lower DUI deaths and injuries. A major component of these checkpoints are the deterrent effects it has on those who might drive drunk or drugged impaired, bringing about more awareness and encouraging everyone to use sober designated drivers. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), checkpoints have provided the most effective documented results of any of the DUI enforcement strategies, while also yielding considerable cost savings of $6 for every $1 spent. Ninety Percent of California drivers approve of checkpoints. As a result of this information many local law enforcement agencies are implementing  DUI checkpoints in an effort to reduce and deter DUI driving.  Checkpoints are placed in locations that have the greatest opportunity for achieving drunk and drugged driving deterrence and provide the greatest safety for officers and the public. As an example,  the San Bernardino Police Department Traffic Unit conducted a DUI/Drivers License checkpoint on 10-24-14, in the 400 block of E. 9th Street in San Bernardino between the hours of 6:00 p.m. and 2:00 a.m.  During this checkpoint there were:
  • 307 Vehicles Screened
  • 6 DUI-Alcohol suspects arrested
  • 2 arrests for warrants
  • 14 Drivers cited/arrested for operating a vehicle unlicensed or while suspended/revoked
  • 13 Citations issued for non-DUI charges
  • 18 Vehicles impounded
San Bernardino PD will be conducting another DUI saturation patrol on Friday, November 14th, 2014 in our ongoing commitment to lowering deaths and injuries upon our streets and highways.  The checkpoint was funded by a grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety, through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.