NTSB Investigates Fatal Metro-North Derailment

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) report on the Metro-North derailment in the Bronx is only in its first days, but it has already turned up some startling facts. The train derailed on the morning of Dec. 1, right outside the Spuyten Duyvil station, with four fatalities and 70 injuries as the tragic result. As is customary in NTSB investigations, as well as all kinds of accident reconstructions, two event recorders from the derailed train were examined. The train, plane, or truck’s speed is just one of the many specifics documented by the vehicle’s event recorder. According to NTSB board member Earl Weener, the train headed into the curve just ahead of the station at 82 mph, in a zone where the speed limit drops from 70 mph to 30 mph. In addition, the NTSB also found some kind of problem with the train’s brake pressure. A mere five seconds prior to the engine finally stopping, brake pressure dropped from 120 psi to 0. NTSB investigators still have more work to do to determine whether or not the brakes were functioning correctly and why the pressure went to 0. U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) remarked that “given this was the fifth major accident or malfunction on the Metro-North Railroad in just over six months, major questions have arisen about safety on the commuter railroad system.” As of Dec. 3, the NTSB states that it remains unclear whether human error or faulty equipment was responsible for this deadly derailment. Their investigation continues. Needless to say, this fatal accident has brought service on the line to a halt, inconveniencing thousands of commuters. N.Y. Governor Cuomo said in a statement on Monday that he expects to see Metro-North service restored toward the end of the week, though officials for the railroad itself said there was no definitive timetable for full service.

Tags: ,